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on the economy. the washington post writes that the white house is ratcheting up pressure to avoid the fiscal cliff. on c-span tonight, we will bring you some of the house and senate debate from august of 2011, when congress passed the budget control act that triggered cuts to take effect on january 1. we will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said w
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
. >> obama: by 2025, the average fuel economy of their vehicles will nearly double to almost 55 miles per gallon. it will save a typical family more than $8,000 in fuel costs over time. >> jennifer: now of course, if you get an electric vehicle like i have, it is over 250 miles per gallon if you go to the gas at all. anyway, if president obama likes it then the right wing, of course, must hate it! and they do. with a passion and vitriol that is usually reserved for the war on christmas and misplaced birth certificates. >> even with the $7500 federal rebate or whatever you get for it, it is still beyond pricy for a fred flintstone car. >> trying to push this crazy green agenda. we're twice the size. >> i can't tell you how annoying. get out of car. go in the trunk. get this long cord. hook it into the side. plug it into the wall. >> first world problem. >> it was raining. i'm worried i'm going to get electrocuted. >> the electric car is about taking away choices from the american people about -- the electric car i
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
a share so many in common -- an economy and larger value system. we share security needs and we share security threats. when you have a relationship that close, it cannot help but be good. it has been good. i look for to four more years of working with president obama. >> you just returned from asia. you seem dead like them in a little jet lag. >> president obama is in asia. his first trip when he was elected was here in ottawa. his first trip for his reelection was asia. you both you asia as important both of you are committed to enhancing free trade. you are looking at 50 trade deals. i wanted to ask you -- when our organization was founded 25 years ago, we were founded to be a proponent of free trade. there are not enough voices on either side of the border that point out the benefits. that is why we started it. my observation is that canadians are more open to free trade than americans. their message is of protectionism. what are your observations? what do you attribute the difference to? >> in negotiations on trade agreement -- we are and 50 to go she asians. one is with the euro
on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they do it, making a point that voters will be looking to see if they can do this in a cooperative manner, whether
that in itself says that when the economy is contracting, there is a competitive advantage to having an education. >> has always struck me with my students. apple would much rather have students with a liberal arts background than a background in computer science or engineering. they are much more adaptable and capable of change. i am not aware of this study, but during the late 1990s, the business higher education forum conducted a study of ceos and see what they sought from college graduates. while they expected some skills, what they were really after was individuals that were committed to continuing having had capacity to continue to learn. not only that they are adapted to change that they can drive change and adapt to an increasingly diverse world. in that sense, it really kind of defines the important part of a liberal education is a background the background for this. the other thing i would mention we really need a liberal arts training before they enter these programs. so i think it really reinforces that. >> i think you are very bright about the data. particularly over the long-term. a
. we'll invent it in america and then become a service-based economy. well, here we are, and these new service sector jobs aren't paying off, literally. right now a job in the leisure and hospitality sector averages $13 an hour. that's $27,000 a year, if you work full-time. retail, not much better. average hourly rate, about $16 an hour. this is the average. it takes into account everyone from the store manager to the stock boy. let me show you one tier higher, manufacturing. bringing in almost $24 an hour on average. that's a solid $50,000 a year. that's also the median income for u.s. households. education and health services, these are important jobs for society. workers there earn an average of $24.28 an hour and also around 50 grand a year. again, if you work fulltime. then there's the very top. those are highly educated, highly skilled and highly motivated. census data show the top 20% making six figures, pulling in almost half of the income in the u.s. for this american recovery to work we need to have a middle, a big, prosperous happy middle. don't you think? it has defined gen
and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next election is going to have to dec
comprehensive immigration reform. he sees it as a key part to stabilizing the economy, investing in the middle class, not having a subclass of 11 million people that hurt economic revitalization. for him i think it is a piece of the middle class agenda. >> are the other unions working with senator schuman who say they are starting to work on a piece of legislation? >> the majority leader and center schumer. we have some issues with this idea, but we applaud his enthusiasm. we are trying to get him on the steps of key elements that are important to us. >> where do you disagree? >> i think he thinks a national id card is required. we do nothing that needs to be part of the solution to fixing the broken immigration system. >> washington journal continues. host:jim martin n. he will be talking about the future of health care, especially the elements of the affordable care act that are put to place. guest: glad to be here. host: what does it mean in general for older americans now that the election is over? guest: i think things like obamacare, the affordable care act, seniors were opposed to it b
.7%, the highest since july, 2007 and 60.8% in october, 2011. what does it mean for our economy? guest: sometimes there is a direct correlation between what we see in terms of how consumers feel about the economy and what they are willing to spend in terms of the holidays and in general. what we are seeing now especially when you look at the university of michigan reported that the optimism about progress in the job market is offsetting a lot of concern about the fiscal cliff and the possibility of tax increases and cuts to government spending. host: when you look at consumer confidence and sentiment, what factors are in play? guest: a lot of times it has to do with how they feel about their own personal fan -- finances and how they feel about the job market and the prospects of finding employment or losing employment. there is a lot of concern still about the high unemployment levels but the idea that the housing market is improving and the idea that there are a lot more employers that are willing to slowly higher at this point seems to be reassuring consumers that there is some hope for the eco
or economy. the largest beneficiary would be california. we want to see what the cutting edge is. most of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good id
cut down the economy. our friend, not warren buffett but the other guy. a great conversation, ralph nader has been by. years ago -- >> what did he learn from his -- >> did me a favor of not bothering me with his problems which was great that spin too much time trying to make money. >> a useful friends with him? >> i never said anything about him. >> as we go, you have an unusual hobby. you, something unusual. >> i have a collection of backers. also have a collection of airsickness bags. one thing i do ask people who come to the meeting, very helpful if you are traveling, you have an airsickness bag which the free present government afghanistan air sickness bag, so it is a great collection and somebody mentioned years ago in a profile starting in an e-mail, this is -- and odd quirky thing i did. >> what is the mood at the meeting going to be? >> people are very optimistic. people were disappointed because we didn't have the house senate president and then people thought we were going to get the president in the senate and stock didn't go up. we elected a house stronger than the last
economy by shopping at locally owned stores. the movement is in its third year. and it is growing. according to a new survey 67% of shopper who's know about small business saturday plan to take part in it. that's up 44% from last year. dave, i know this has made you very sad. hollywood is mourning the loss of larry hagman. >> j.r. >> wait a minute. it's your style j.r., my wife and the man who put cliff barnes in office. >> you have got plenty of trouble before y'all got married. i don't understand why you think she has changed. >> hey. stop. knock it off. >> classic. >> legend. >> hagman best known for his role of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he w
as well as our economy. my message was pretty simple. a solution is possible. republicans have been reasonable and president needs to lead. he is the only one who can get us to a solution. if that's what he wants, we'll succeed. so it was with some concern that i read this morning that the president plans to hit the road next week to drum up support for his own personal approach to the short- and long-term fiscal challenges we face. in other words, rather than sitting down with lawmakers of both parties and working out an agreement, he's back on the campaign trail, presumably with the same old talking points that we're all quite familiar with, but we already know the president is a very good campaigner. we congratulate him on his reelection. what we don't know is whether i has the leadership qualities necessary to lead his party to a bipartisan agreement on big issues like we currently face. so let me suggest that if the president wants a solution to the challenges of the moment, the people needs to be talking to are members of his own party so he can convince them of the need to ac
for the workplace. we are not going to be the world's most innovative economy. second, in some ways, more surprising for me, it was brought to us by the former chief of secretary of the army, who talked about the problems in our education system and the relationship to the armed forces. the inability of some 70% of americans actually qualified for service in the armed forces ought to be a red flag for anyone. now, yes, there are other reasons for that. incarceration, obesity, but a fair amount of it is that the people can't pass the basic skills test to get into the military. so just imagine a country -- a developed country, a powerful country in the world. and we can't get the basic tasks. analyzing data secretary of state is realizing how few people how -- how they learn foreign languages, the fact that we don't have people who are prepared to go into the intelligence agency and we are lobbying ourselves appellate in literally the national security infrastructure of the country. so most importantly, it is a tragedy that people will not be prepared for a good job and will therefore have nowhere els
. there is no reason for any of that. >> on the other hand, there is a big boost to the economy because of black friday. >> there you go. >> except for the stuff that was -- >> stephanie: although the black president will get no credit. [ ♪ circus ♪ ] >> see what you did there. >> stephanie: you know how one holiday is over and the next one -- julie in seattle reminds us, war on christmas season is officially open. it is fox news warren christmas season. >> they're losing their [ bleep ] the whole benghazi thing isn't working out for them. >> the susan rice thing is petering out. >> stephanie: yes. oh dear. steph, deck the halls with simmering resentment and bitterness over the imaginary days gone by when everyone was white christian and happy happy, happy until the christmas lights came down. friday morning, fox on on some idiot story about the nativity scene. we have a guest to quote. [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] who said it is christmas all over again. the grinch is trying to steal our holiday. it has been so b
cut for high-income earners on the economy. there is this supposition, in fact i would call it bedrock republican philosophy economically speaking if you cut rates for top earners it benefits gdp. i will point to everybody for consideration a chart by the david leanhart of the "new york times" that shows what happens when you cut the top income tax rates. it doesn't help gdp. in fact, it falls. explain to me why republicans keep insisting on this fact when it doesn't appear at least to be true? >> well, the basic idea is that if you get to keep more of the rewards for each hour you work you'll work more hours or a little harder or be more likely to start a business. that's not a crazy idea on its face. in fact, it's probably right. the real question, though, is, is it a bigger effect or small effect? so republicans claim time and again this is a huge effect. democrats often claims it's a small effect. in the language of economics this is an argument about elast tisty. like my colleagues here go out and try to measure this. it's a difficult concept to measure. but that's basically the i
president obama's deep cuts will have a deep effect to our economy. he used the word dwast stating. snowing this how could anyone support depleting another $1.8 billion from an already stretched budget? president obama's climate chief defended the green fleet by arguing even a dollar rise in gasoline prices would cost d.o.d. $30 billion. believe my good friend, the senator from colorado said essentially the same thing. i agree with that. if every $1 rise in gas prices cost $30 million, a $27 increase would add up to about $660 million so that argument falls completely flat in realizing the economic angle is a political hoozer the obama administration has tried to say it's about national security in getting off of foreign oil. that's where i want to get. i spent several years as chairman of the environment and public works committee and several years as the ranking member. all during that time people keep saying the one thing we all agree on is we need to be off of foreign oil. we need not to be dependent upon the middle east. and yet right now we know and no one is going to refute this fact
when you add economic disaster with good prospects down the road people take to the streets the economy in egypt has not gotten better. >> then to have the right course of the track them to replace with another dictator. >> that has not because of political stability. they are getting their money out with business opportunities and prospects so people are back in the street. they don't get $1.5 billion per month then they don't have food. melissa: k.t. mcfarland. let's check the market with nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. facebook is called to outperform over the next year? >> we have seen facebook get pummeled from the ipo at $38 and is sold off but the last three months have been looking better it is up over 8% but the one that you talk about they are somewhat bearish saying it will outperform the s&p and lot of people underestimating the revenue growth over 10 or two years. a positive note for facebook. melissa: the park ridge in a bare tree will cost you more the hold gift list would be $107,000.61% increase over last year but not everything cost more out of the 300 an
. they are going to buy smart phones. i think the global economy's -- the emerging market economy will pick us all up if we do get picked up. david: they hope the fed picks them up more than they've already done so. there's worry signs there's no end to the printing. john williams in which he told the journal, quote, "in terms of how far you can go, i don't think we're anywhere near that kind of limit." it seems like they are going the whole distance. >> absolutely. look, this is not -- this has been coming on for a long time. you're a student of history, going back to the roman empire, germany, england, any major, you know, economic entity in the world. david: look how the runs ended. forgive me for interrupted, but look how they ended. super inflation is usually the way these things end. >> well, we hope eventually, right now, a dysfunctional government in europe, united states as well as in japan, and it's too tempting to print money to solve all of these things, and as long as the markets are willing to, you know, absorb the printing of the capital, things will continue to move forward. anythi
where they can. >> the factors that are behind these numbers relate primarily to the economy and, as we all know, the economy is still sluggish but there is improvement. >> reporter: aaa estimates 45% of travelers left the wednesday before thanksgiving with 36% returning today and another 25% returning on monday. and if the big travel day before thanksgiving was any indication, it could be a long journey home. this is what it looked like on the 405 in los angeles on the big getaway day with traffic backed up for miles. and on thanksgiving morning, as drivers headed out on i-10 east outside beaumont, texas, dense fog caused a deadly chain reaction pileup involving 100 vehicles. husband and wife, vincent and debbie leggieo, were killed. 100 people injured and the trail of twisted wreckage stretched for two miles. and now forecasters say more fog and even snow in parts of the midwest and northeast could make it a little tougher getting home after a long holiday weekend. and, again, the roads along the new jersey turnpike this hour so far so good but later today, erica, this could be a virt
that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group
the economy. now why doesn't our president have better clout bigger clout. i'm going to use my clout to take us to peace. >> well, if it were that easy, i would have done that by now. >> stephanie: he just reminded me of one of the bush quirks we hated so much is that when he would say a word, he would say another word and then use the same word. in other words -- >> i got the capital. political capital. that's different than what you just said. >> it is a new word i learned. >> capital. political capital. >> stephanie: carol in pennsylvania hi, welcome. >> caller: thank you. i want to wish you all happy holiday. you deserve it. >> stephanie: thank you. >> caller: i want to thank you your staff you're all marvelous. i can't say enough about you. and for reality sprinkles with some comedy, lots of comedy and great thoughts. >> stephanie: thank you. happy thanksgiving to you and yours. >> thank you. >> stephanie: by the way would you like a sad story about my sad little life because having thanksgiving to you a
to the economy. >>> and to a developing story now out of new england tonight. an explosion in springfield, massachusetts. this camera capturing the explosion right when it happened. two buildings flattened, sending a huge cloud of dark smoke into the air. right now, it appears a natural gas leak could be the cause. we're told the impact could be felt miles away. >>> to the weather now and to two real signs of what's come to. snow in michigan this evening at this college football game between northern illinois and eastern michigan. all part of a massive storm gathering steam. and the other headline? the plummeting temperatures. so, we bring in abc mrng jinger see. that system with all the snow, that's on the move tonight? >> reporter: that is. and, you know, we're going to drop off a little bit on the east coast, temperature wise but we're not going to get the snow. in places up in northern wisconsin, northern michigan, already 8 to 12 inches. let's see where that lake effect snoet moves now. still going to get a few more inches in parts of michigan and wisconsin, but look it from clevelan
you seen that should give people hope? >> well, one thing is the economy is finally starting to diversify. i think that has been a positive thing about the auto industry being on the ropes. the city and the state as a whole doesn't seem to be putting all of its shifts solely on the auto industry as it happens did in the past and i write quite a bit about the bottom-up energy that is happening in the city. and i write about the do it yourself city like detroit. the government really isn't functioning properly, but it does give people the sort of space to do things like plant urban gardens or just start their sort of own entrepreneurial operations without much getting in the way, because as i said there's not -- >> jennifer: there's a lot of land. right. detroit was a city that was built for 2 million people but now only about 700,000 live there. and people are using some of that vacant land for -- for example, urban farming. how successful has that been? >> it is doing good. it is sort of a metaphor these green shoots coming from the industrialists of o
on the ground? >> well, the israeli economic blockade is devastating to the gaza economy. the people in gaza, the palestinians in gaza are not able to export most of what they produce. whether agriculture or handy crafts or whatever. they can't get it out of the country. and so their own market and that's it. it has driven people into poverty. it has created about 56% of palestinians in gaza are food insecure. they're not starving to death. there's not a lot of -- malnutrition. it is not clear to me why the israeli -- that should be about bringing in weapons. to send out their goods. >> jennifer: so juan, you heard hussein's description of the challenge with hamas palestinian authority. what can be done at these peace talks or at the cease-fire talks to make sure that the palestinian authority is perhaps elevated or should they? >> well, it would be a good thing for the palestinians if they could bury the hatchet amongst themselves. i think the government of hosni mubarak and egypt connived at dividing them and th
did a wonderful job to keep the economy on track, hasn't it? >> greg: opposed to socialnism >> bob: opposed to misguided management. >> dana: even when the employees vote to not be in the union the union does this on their behalf. that is what we're supposed to believe. unions are feeling their oath. if romney would have won, they would have done it as well. the unions are declining so much with people part of them they trying to do what they can. they risk losing in court of public opinion. earlier today, they sat in sixth avenue to proest he had to come to work today. everyone was yelling at him and saying ridiculous. get up and get to work. >> greg: union of one. >> bob: you make a good point. the union membership declined dramatically. i don't know what you are worried about. you a right for a union and collectively bargain. >> greg: we have a right to travel. >> dana: you talk about prime minister benjamin netanyahu would risk going too far and losing support in the international court of public opinion. do you not agree that the union is doing this and to greg's point now eve
hostage, but the economy as well. production can't continue as long as this uncertainty. >> alisyn: jonathan, they don't think that they are he' holding the american people hostage, they think they're standing on principle so when both sides think they are he' standing on principle, how are they ever going to meet in the middle by december 31st? >> well, and the president's standing on principle and standing on the wrong principle. he's standing on the principle that the rich have to pay for entitlement state. obama believes that the rich have to pay for his entitlement spending, the result of course is more redistribution, less wealth. less production and who will he blame when the time comes if the economy is weak? he'll blame the rich of course. yes, people are standing on principles and i think they are he' standing on the wrong principles, that's government spending and control creates wealth. we know it doesn't, but yet, that seems to be the direction at least many on the left want to bring us down. >> alisyn: let's say the worst happens and let's say that the fiscal cliff, w
. the president promised transparency. the republicans promised certain wisdom when it comes to the economy. unfortunately, and it has not just been this term or last term. this has been going on for a number of years which i think speaks to why we need term limits. host: a few more of the poll results from gallup and "usa today." the dark blue is from 2008, the light blue is from 2012. bring troops home from afghanistan. improve conditions for minorities and the poor. improved education. keep the u.s. safe from terrorism. the quality of the environment. reduce unemployment dropped from 67% to 56%. improve the health care system dropped from 64% to 55%. to go over to the budget, substantially reduce the budget deficit. 42% thought the obama administration would be able to do that in 2008. avoid raising taxes. control illegal immigration. heal political divisions in this country. 54% thought so in 2008. bob in north carolina on are democrats' line. you are up next. caller: i just think it is going to be better coming up this next time because i believe obama it did need a second chance. i vo
gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. not in this economy. we also have zero free time, and my dad moving in. so we went to fidelity. we looked at our family's goals and some ways to help us get there. they helped me fix my economy, the one in my house. now they're managing my investments for me. and with fidelity, getting back on track was easier than i thought. call or come in today to take control of your personal economy. get one-on-one help from america's retirement leader. >> welcome back. attorney general eric older in the hot seat this time for the handling of the david petraeus affair and the decision not to inform the president about this until after the election. >> we conducted the investigation and we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. had we made the determination that a threat to national security existed we would have made that known to the president and appropriate members on the hill. but was the president really kept in the dark about a potential national security risk
building the economy again. -- no matter what the grover norquist or lindsey graham or any of them say, every republican in the house should vote to raise taxes on the rich. the average republican is not making $250,000 a year. they're just saying they should not raise taxes because they are republicans. host: are you a republican? caller: i am, but i voted for obama. host: what would it take for you to vote for republican? in terms of the fiscal cliff, sequestration, big budget cuts, what do you want to see them do? caller: if the republicans could find a candidate that would do what ronald reagan dipped, they would gladly get my vote back. as long as they have people like john mccain, sarah palin, and mitt romney, they are just playing. host: here's a story in the new --k times . david is up next, new york, good morning. caller: good morning. how are ya? i'm a republican and i don't believe that the 1% or a portion of the country should be taxed. it can be mathematically proven. a president handed in m speech to be scored. he never came up with a plan how this money would be redistr
the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered if the recommendations you are making i understand that you are trying to bring together all these agencies across the executive branch whether they are of the legislative branch is a very much partner in this. how do your recommendations bring the congressional leaders and to coordinate with them as well as the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this would be institutionalized or created also legislatively. but i think the congress will benefit from what our council would come up with. congress would benefit from. i guarantee you with the members of the congress particularly the senate we looked at the quadrennial report and we know what the result was of that in that study analysis of what we need going forw
for the overall economy, but the impact on women and children and some of our most vulnerable would be devastating, and that's why your particular focus today in special order is so important. the united states currently ranks about 50th in the world in infant mortality. and morocco, 1.8 infants under one year of age, they die for every 1,000 live births each year. in japan the number is 2.2. in the united states, to our shame, the number is six. from new zealand to all other advanced countries around the world, they do much better than the united states in this most fundamental measure of health and well-being. and the people who are most affected by this failure are not those who have been irresponsible, they are not slackers, they are not lazy, they are babies. they are babies. mostly babies who have been born into poverty. this is a metric that we should feel morally bound to improve by leaps and bounds. but instead we are about to make it worse for these babies. if we don't act, and if we don't act swiftly to prevent sequestration. if this congress does not act to prevent this country from pl
$2.30 trillion of our gross domestic product, money we could have added to this economy. we are now in a place where we are playing catch-up with countries that used to crave to be like us. it is so bad now that while our university systems are still where they should be in terms of reputation and attainment, no one from other countries want to send their kids over here to our k-12 schools. they do that there and then it they will say, will try some ivy league school. we need to seriously look at, what is it going to take to change that dynamic. in recent days, we have heard about the teachers' strike. i think that the big challenge we have, if we put ourselves in these partisan boxes and we force people when we talk about education to take sides -- the side that is never adequately represented in these discussions is kids. i just posted on my blog, i said, okay, how will it teachers' strike in chicago help kids? i got all these responses from people who love teachers, people who are mad at teachers. i had 40 people just immediately respond. no one answered that question. they start
for the economy. tahman bradley, abc news, washington. >> in addition to the deals that tahman mentioned. electronics are also today. kindle fire is $30 cheaper. and a panasonic tv by 60 ps. not bad. we've got even more cyber monday deals coming up later today on "good morning america." >>> and we breaking news overnight from bangladesh where yet another fire has broken out at a garment factory. at least eight people were hurt in today's fire, and this comes after more than 100 workers died in a blaze at a similar fact tore nearby. officials say the death toll would have been much lower. but there were no emergency exitses in the nine-story building. the factory made clothing for walmart and other stores in the u.s. and britain. survives say when the fire alarm went off, they were told it was a malfunction and to go back to work. >> an avoidable tragedy. >>> and this is expected to be another tumultuous week for egypt's president mohamed morsi. they clashed in the square in cairo yesterday. a teenager was killed and 40 people hurt. morsi who, of course, brokered the mideast cease-fire la
amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have, why do you say we are in danger of blowing it? guest: there was a large amount of investment made in recent years to extract that gas. we are looking at different ways of using it. both the price and supply in the long term may be more constrained. guest: -- host: you also argue the problem of the aging energy trend. guest: is the transition to gas. this year a large portion of the energy produced in the united states, almost 50% is going to be produced by natural gas. a big change. a long-term evolution that we have been going through. coal-fired plants have been taken off line this year in record numbers. that has been made up by more utilization of existing natural gas plants. that is a good thing for the grid, it creates a lot of flexibility. the challenge that we have, as anyone living in the eastern part of the united states has recognized, is that the grid itself is very susceptible to storms and other kinds of power interruptions
our economy. also this afternoon, senior staff, including jack lou, valerie jarrett, secretary geithner will meet with leaders of fix the debt, including maya mcginnis anders kin bowles. tomorrow he will have an event with middle class americans again to talk about and highlight the importance of extending tax cuts to the middle class, to 98% of american taxpayers and 97% of small businesses. this is vital, it is something that everyone in washington agrees must be done. and it is something that the house of representatives could do today. or tomorrow. if they so chose. because the senate has already passed a bill that extends those tax cuts, if the house were to pass them, the president would sign it right away and that would create certainty for 98% of american taxpayers, middle class families around the country, 97% of america's small businesses, and would go a long way, or significant way toward dealing with the so-called fiscal cliff. also tomorrow, the president has another meeting with business leaders following the one he had prior to the thanksgiving holiday. so -- fri
, the deficit equalled 10% of the whole economy and now it equals just 7%. so go ahead, boggle your uncle's mind with this chart. the bars below zero represent years when the deficit grew. these bars above zero represent years when the deficit shrunk. we're here right now in the deficit shrunk portion of the chart. the point of the shrinkingest shrinking on the whole chart back to 1950. when somebody stops inevitably nattering about the fiscal cliff and the skyrocketing deficit, they don't know what they're
a way to avoid that so called fiscal cliff that could raise your taxes and throw the economy back into recession. kristen welker is in our washington bureau. good morning. >> reporter: president obama is also facing a number of challenges overseas, as you say, from the unrest in the middle east to the continuing fallout over the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. but the fiscal cliff looms large. president obama returning from a post-thanksgiving round of golf, but off the links, the clock is ticking. lawmakers need to hammer out a deal to prevent the so called fiscal cliff. deep spending cuts and tax hikes set to take effect next year. >> i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. >> reporter: after a meeting at the white house last week, congressional leaders struck a rare tone of bipartisanship. >> we had a very constructive meeting with the president. >> we feel very comfortable with each other. >> reporter: but a major sticking point remains -- taxes. president obama wants to let the bush era tax cuts expire for the wealthiest americans. many repu
to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo hoo! [ male announcer ] iams. with 50% more animal protein. [ dog 2 ] i'm an iams dog for life. not a rabbit. woof! >> osgood: take a good, quick look. serving of gelato doesn't last long under hot studio lights nor does a serving last long when it's placed before anyone with a sweet tooth. alan pizzey found plenty of those in the city that's the birth place of gelato. >> reporter: the fat one may seem an unflattering nickname for a city with the oldest university in europe, but it is actually a compliment. bologna is the gastronomic heart of italy, the place where food is an art form. and nothing epitomizes it like the dell he's
that small businesses have to our economy, creating half of the private work force and two-thirds of the net new jobs. >> karen, basic question but an important one for consumers going out today. what is a small business? if i'm out shopping, how do i identify it? >> as you walk down main street in the community, many people have people with whom they have relations. it might abdely, a cupcake shop but you can walk in that business on small business start, and they have been preparing for months now. at the small business administration we've had a web page, they have come on and gotten tips so you might see a sign in the door. you might see a shop local. you might see them right out on the corner saying please help us celebrate small business saturday. and we are saying thank you to those people in our community who have done so much. they create jobs, and they support the little league and the girl scouts, so right on saturday i'm going to be walking down main street inri roslindal in boston saying thank you to the community. >> this is the third year you've done it. have you seen tangible
for success as the economy is recovering. the gap between rich and poor in this country has never been greater. we need to find ways to create more balanced. we are fighting to say, less than have -- let's go back to the tax rate we had in the clinton era. when you are talking about marginal tax rates for those who are making above $250,000 -- the bottom line in california is not about pensions. california has passed do revenue from the recent election to try to get money back into schools. you are right that in a public education system, parents should not be asked to subsidize each and every day. that is what is happening in lots of places. i have seen across the country how parents are being axed. it would be better -- i have seen across the country how parents are being asked. there has to be transparency and there has to be accountability in terms of what the money is used for. thes go in and looked at well-rounded education kids have in private schools. in public schools, if kids have special needs, we have to pay more for education for kids with special needs. host: randi weingarten is
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